Journal Articles

Monochromatic infrared therapy in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a pilot study

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Monochromatic infrared therapy in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a pilot study

Harikrishna KR Nair, Siti Aishah Binti Kamis, Sylvia SY Chong
15 March 2021

Neuropathy is the most common microvascular obstacle among patients with diabetes and can involve peripheral, central and/or autonomic nervous systems. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) has a lifetime prevalence of approximately 50% and its prevalence increases with the duration of diabetes. DPN places a huge burden on public health and the economy, accounting for a rise in morbidity and mortality following foot ulcers and amputations. This study aims to determine the effect of monochromatic infrared therapy (MIRE) in people with DPN. The study took place in an outpatient setting at the Wound Care Unit, Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (WCUHKL), using two participants with long-standing diabetes mellitus who were attending their routine treatment visit. Both patients received an hour of active monochromatic Infrared energy (MIRE) after each dressing follow-up, which was twice a week and continued until wound closure. Pain scores and numbness were documented every Monday, using the Visual Analogue Score (VAS) while neurological examination took place during foot assessment.

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